MI Lunch

Date: 14th January 2014, 12.30-1.30pm, Ken Mason Suite, School of Law, University of Edinburgh

Speakers: Professor Stephen Lawrie (Psychiatry) and Professor Graeme Laurie (Mason Institute/Law), University of Edinburgh

Title: Can we predict who will suffer from mental illness and prevent it?

Abstract: Researchers in Edinburgh have been able to show that neuroimaging can identify people at high genetic risk who develop schizophrenia or depression years before they could be clinically diagnosed. Other researchers around the world have been able to do the same and it may also be possible to predict recidivism in criminals.  These studies raise a range of practical and ethical issues, including the potential harms of labelling people versus the potential benefits of early intervention and prevention. Equally, these developments have implications for the duties of researchers in deciding whether to feedback results and whether they are required to do so as part of their duty of care.

To register: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/can-we-predict-who-will-suffer-from-mental-illness-and-prevent-it-tickets-9725103045

Launch FEVER MEDICINE:

Title: ‘Human Enhancement and Fever Medicine – Launch of an Illustrated Novel’

Where: Pulp Fiction, Bread Street, Edinburgh

When: Friday, 24 January 2014, 19:00-20:00 Shawn Harmon, the author of Fever Medicine, will introduce the genesis of this illustrated novel, followed by a brief reading, and will then invite those present to participate in a dialogue around the ethics of human enhancement. The discussion will be followed by wine and nibbles. Numbers for this event are limited. Free tickets can be obtained through Event Brite (link to follow). Copies of Fever Medicine can be purchased on the evening.

Title: ‘The Art and Science of Science Communication Through Arts: The Case of Fever Medicine, an Illustrated Novel’

Where: Playfair Library, Old College, University of Edinburgh

When: Monday, 27 January 2014, 18:00-20:00 A panel of experts chaired by Professor Jonathan Gibbs of the Edinburgh College of Art will discuss fiction and the arts in science and law communication. Shawn Harmon, law lecturer and author of Fever Medicine, will speak about the creative process which resulted in Fever Medicine, an illustrated novel that explores a range of legal and bioethical issues in a near-future setting. Award winning Scottish author, Ken McLeod, will talk about the fiction writing process and the science fiction ‘toolkit’. Catherine Southworth, teacher and Communications and Outreach Manager for two EU-funded stem cell research consortia, will discuss science communication and her experience in the development of ‘Hope Beyond Hype’, a comic book format stem cell science teaching tool.

 

The panel presentation will be followed by an open discussion and thereafter by a wine reception. Numbers for this event are limited. Free tickets can be obtained through Event Brite (link to follow). Copies of Fever Medicine can be purchased on the evening.

MI Lunch  

Date: 4th February 2014, 12.30-1.30pm, Ken Mason Suite, School of Law, University of Edinburgh

Speaker: Dr Stephanie Fohring, Research Fellow, School of Law, University of Edinburgh

Title: Beyond incidents andindividuals: psychology in victimology

Abstract: Much research into the experiences of crime victims is conducted using large scale, nationally representative surveys which have the unfortunate tendency to reduce victim experience to a number of ‘yes’  or ‘no’ responses to a predetermined set of questions. Although such data can be hugely informative, it may also obscure significant factors relevant to victim decision making and behaviour, particularly so regarding the decision to become involved with formal avenues of justice. This research, to the contrary, goes beyond the binary by introducing, and empirically supporting, social psychological theory as a means of understanding low levels of involvement with the criminal justice system.

To register: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/beyond-incidents-and-individuals-psychology-in-victimology-tickets-9726916469

 

MI Lunch

Date: 24th February 2014, 12.30-1.30pm, Ken Mason Suite, School of Law, University of Edinburgh

Speaker: Marie-Andree Jacob, School of Law, Keele University

Title: Research Misconduct, Professional Regulation, and Tailored Legalities: an analysis of General Medical Council casework, 1990-2012

Abstract: In my talk I will discuss the results of an AHRC-funded project on the ways research misconduct has been characterised and addressed by the GMC, between 1990 and 2012. There have been excellent studies of the management of risks, errors and negligence amongst medical doctors, and on the regulation and disciplining of UK medical doctors  but very little has been written on the disputes, complaints and adjudication that may stem from problematical research activities by medics.  This is surprising given the fact that these types of breaches can have very serious public health impacts, affecting not one patient as in the typical doctor-patient encounter, but potentially many.

To register: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/research-misconduct-professional-regulation-and-tailored-legalities-an-analysis-of-general-medical-tickets-9727333717

 

MI Lunch

Date: 4th March 2014, 12.30-1.30pm, Ken Mason Suite, School of Law, University of Edinburgh

Speaker: Dr Cate Heeney, Research Fellow, Science, Technology and Innovation Studies, University of Edinburgh

Title: That was an ethical moment – towards a Deleuzian approach to the ethics of data sharing

Abstract: Moves to more open forms of data sharing such as the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium model and the use of repositories including UK biobank have raised debate on the ethical legal and social consequences of such changes. A literature arising in the last decade from the overlapping fields of medical sociology and STS has grappled with how ethics are enacted in biomedical practices.   In considering how ethics and practice interact I will cover similar ground to a sociology of bioethics (Haimes), however with different conclusions about the role of ethics in practice and about our role as scholars with an interest in ethics. I will draw on Actor Network Theory and specifically the notion of translation (Callon) and Latours advice to follow controversy (2005). These concepts enable the exploration of how discourse is signaling beyond the here and now to mobilise support for what is not, this is precisely why it is a useful tool to consider the role of the moral in relation to ethics and practice. This approach offers a way to engage with those aspects of ethics which are important to the practitioners negotiating the formal ethics aspects of the governance frameworks and practice. However, I will look at the how a Deleuzian reading can offer alternatives to current approaches to the study of ethics and practice coming from sociology and to a lesser extent empirical ethics. Deleuze suggests that actual arrangements are always subject to evident or underlying change. This is an important point for those who wish to engage with as well as describe ethics practices and would to some extent satisfy those such as Latour who would avoid coming to the field with too many assumptions be they contextual or of the abstract moral kind.   In order to explicate this approach the paper engages with interview data gathered from 49 members of biomedical research community in the UK whose practices involved with biobanks between 2006- 2008.

To register: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/that-was-an-ethical-moment-towards-a-deluezian-approach-to-the-ethics-of-data-sharing-tickets-9727470125

MI Lunch          

Date: 9th April 2014, 12.30-1.30pm, Ken Mason Suite, School of Law, University of Edinburgh

Speaker: Dr Ian Morrison, Consultant Sleep Medicine, Department of Sleep Medicine, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh

Title: Non-insane automatisms – A perspective from sleep

To register: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/non-insane-automatisms-a-perspective-from-sleep-tickets-9727514257

MI Seminar        

Date: 6th May 2014, 12.30-1.30pm, Ken Mason Suite, School of Law, University of Edinburgh

Speaker: Dr John S Callender MD FRCPsych, Consultant Psychiatrist/Associate Medical Director, Royal Cornhill Hospital, Aberdeen

Title: Neuroscience and Moral Responsibility

To register: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/neuroscience-and-moral-responsibility-tickets-9727626593

MI Lunch          

Date: 10th June 2014, 12.30-1.30pm, Ken Mason Suite, School of Law, University of Edinburgh

Speaker: Dr Tineke Broer, Research Fellow, Centre for Population Health Sciences

Title: Neuroscience and Family Life: The Brain in Policy and Everyday Practice

Abstract: The project is about the consequences of the neurosciences on policies and on families, and will involve an analysis of relevant policy documents as well as interviews with families, to understand the use and non-use of neurosciences in policies and in how families define themselves. This talk will focus mostly on the policy analysis.

To register: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/neuroscience-and-family-life-the-brain-in-policy-and-everyday-practice-tickets-9727690785

 

MI Events 2014 – Confirmed
Tagged on: