A recent article by Graeme Laurie and Leslie Stevens has been published in the Journal of Law and Society. “Developing a Public Interest Mandate for the Governance and Use of Administrative Data in the United Kingdom” addresses the legal and ethical uncertainties surrounding the use of administrative data for research.

Drawing upon best practices developed by Laurie and Stevens in previous data initiatives and engagement with research communities, the article suggests a problematic organizational culture as the most significant barrier to proportionate and good governance of administrative data, and offers a novel means for data custodians to identify key considerations related to sector-specific practices.

Read “Developing a Public Interest Mandate for the Governance and Use of Administrative Data in the United Kingdom”

Continuing their work on the legal work package of ADRC Scotland, in April 2016, Stevens and Laurie organised with colleagues at the National Records of Scotland the workshop: ‘From a culture of caution to a culture of confidence: lessons learned from implementing the Public Records (Scotland) Act 2011’.

The workshop provided a forum for discussion between key stakeholders to consider the wider benefits of using public sector data and to connect the work of records managers to each public authority’s commitment to the public and their service users. Participants included Scottish public authorities tasked with implementing the Public Records (Scotland) Act 2011 as well as other stakeholders involved and interested in the sharing and governance of public sector data. The key discussion points from the workshop are summarised in the Workshop Report.

Please contact leslie.a.stevens@ed.ac.uk for further information.

New Article on the Use of Administrative Data