The Mason Institute offers an exciting calendar of events throughout the year for students, academics, practitioners, and the public. Here you will find details of our MI lunches, annual lectures, work in progress seminars, and more!

May
23
Thu
MI Writing Retreat @ Room 2.29, 50 George Square,The University of Edinburgh EH8 9LH, UK
May 23 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Are you facing writer’s block?

With the multiple demands of academic life, do you have trouble making time for your writing?

Would you welcome support in warding off the mighty distractor that is the Internet?

Writing is hard work and is often relegated to the bottom of our to-do list. Mason Institute (MI) organises a fortnightly writing retreat modelled on the Institute for Academic Development’s writing boot camps: a day of writing, away from wifi and phones, and organised around dedicated writing blocks and breaks. The MI Writing Retreats are open to all. If you would like to join our mailing list, please email Agomoni Ganguli Mitra at Agomoni.Ganguli-Mitra@ed.ac.uk stating your interest.

WRITING RETREAT PROGRAMME

9.00am – 9.30am Set up and set goals for the day
9.30 – 10.45am Writing (1hr 15min)
10.45am – 11.00am Break and Review
11.00am – 12.30pm Writing (1hr 30min)
12.30pm – 1.30pm Lunch
1.30pm – 3.00pm Writing (1hr 30 min)
3.00pm – 3.15pm Break and Review
3.15pm – 4.45pm Writing (1hr 30 min)
4.45pm – 5.00pm Wrap up
May
28
Tue
MI Lunch Seminar with Craig Purshouse @ Teaching Room 01, Old College, South Bridge, Edinburgh, EH8 9YL
May 28 @ 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm

with Craig Purshouse

Talk Title: Is Gay ‘Conversion Therapy’ Negligent? 

Abstract

So-called gay ‘conversion therapy’ involves efforts to change someone’s sexual orientation from homosexual to heterosexual. Although the leading professional bodies are opposed to the practice and the Government’s LGBT Action Plan proposes to prohibit it, many religious groups still offer this form of ‘therapy’. This paper will consider whether the common law of negligence can provide a remedy to those who have suffered harm after undergoing ‘conversion therapy’. I will demonstrate that tort doctrine relating to actionable damage, the standard of care, causation may mean the law of negligence is ill-equipped to compensating the victims of ‘conversion therapy’. I conclude that this is symptomatic of broader problems with law of tort’s emphasis on personal responsibility, autonomy and corrective justice and suggest alternative legal mechanisms for reducing or preventing the practice.

Speaker’s Short Bio

Dr Craig Purshouse is a Lecturer in Law at the University of Leeds. His research interests are in torts law and medical law. He is a member of the Editorial Board of the Medical Law Review and his research has been cited by the Court of Appeal of Singapore and the United Kingdom Supreme Court.

Respondent: TBC

About MI Lunches

Human health is essential for the enjoyment and maximisation of almost all human activities. As our health futures rapidly evolve alongside great medical, scientific, and technological advancement, we are faced with the obligation to both protect patients and promote ethical research. How to successfully navigate these interconnected and complex relationships is a challenge not yet met. The Mason Institute is at the forefront of research into the protection and promotion of human health. The MI Lunch Series reaches across the boundaries of discipline and institution to directly engage with crucial human health actors – researchers, practitioners, policymakers, patients, and the public – to exploit on-going research and explore this challenge.
If you would like to be a part of our series, please contact: mason.institute@ed.ac.uk

May
30
Thu
CANCELLED: MI WiP Seminar @ Teaching Room 11 (2nd Floor), Old College, South Bridge, The University of Edinburgh, EH8 9YL
May 30 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Jun
6
Thu
MI Writing Retreat @ Elder Room, Old College
Jun 6 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Are you facing writer’s block?

With the multiple demands of academic life, do you have trouble making time for your writing?

Would you welcome support in warding off the mighty distractor that is the Internet?

Writing is hard work and is often relegated to the bottom of our to-do list. Mason Institute (MI) organises a fortnightly writing retreat modelled on the Institute for Academic Development’s writing boot camps: a day of writing, away from wifi and phones, and organised around dedicated writing blocks and breaks. The MI Writing Retreats are open to all. If you would like to join our mailing list, please email Agomoni Ganguli Mitra at Agomoni.Ganguli-Mitra@ed.ac.uk stating your interest.

WRITING RETREAT PROGRAMME

9.00am – 9.30am Set up and set goals for the day
9.30 – 10.45am Writing (1hr 15min)
10.45am – 11.00am Break and Review
11.00am – 12.30pm Writing (1hr 30min)
12.30pm – 1.30pm Lunch
1.30pm – 3.00pm Writing (1hr 30 min)
3.00pm – 3.15pm Break and Review
3.15pm – 4.45pm Writing (1hr 30 min)
4.45pm – 5.00pm Wrap up
Jun
13
Thu
MI WiP Seminar @ Carstares Room, Old College
Jun 13 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Jun
19
Wed
MI Lunch Seminar with Dr Jack Thompson @ Moot Court Room, Old College, The University of Edinburgh
Jun 19 @ 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm

with Dr Jack Thompson from University of Brighton

Talk Title: Partners, Foetuses and Abortions

Abstract

In 1986, the first sentence of George Harris’ paper Fathers and Fetuses ([1986] 96(3) Ethics 594-603) read, “Conspicuously absent from most discussions of the abortion issue are considerations of third-party interests, especially those of the father.” This paper seeks to reintroduce a discussion of fathers and non-carrying female partners into the abortion debate. It sets out to consider the role, rights and responsibilities of these ‘non-carrying’ partners. In order to so, I will propose a number of examples to illuminate the moral considerations that may be relevant to the determination of a partner’s role in the decision-making process. I will argue that in some of these cases a prospective partner’s legitimate interest in controlling their reproductive autonomy is harmed by being excluded from decisions to or not to terminate. But this is not determinative of the need to create legal rights in partners. The questions for discussion then are: what rights to reproductive autonomy might a partner have; what factors might catalyse these rights; and, whether these are rights which are legally desirable?

About the Speaker

Jack is a Lecturer in Law at the University of Brighton. He joined the Brighton Business School from the University of Westminster where he had taught and completed his PhD in Moral Philosophy and Reproductive Medicine. He is currently the module leader of the LLB Law of Torts, Healthcare Law and Ethics, and Legal Research Project modules. He has recently had articles published on Rights Theory ([2018] 7(3) Laws 28), Legal Moralism ([2019] 8(1) Laws 6), and Gender Deception in Sexual Offences ([2019] Journal of Criminal Law doi: 10.1177/0022018319834373). He is editing a collection of essays with Claire-Michelle Smyth and Richard Lang entitled Contemporary Challenges to Human Rights Law due to be published in late 2019.

Respondent: TBC

About MI Lunches

Human health is essential for the enjoyment and maximisation of almost all human activities. As our health futures rapidly evolve alongside great medical, scientific, and technological advancement, we are faced with the obligation to both protect patients and promote ethical research. How to successfully navigate these interconnected and complex relationships is a challenge not yet met. The Mason Institute is at the forefront of research into the protection and promotion of human health. The MI Lunch Series reaches across the boundaries of discipline and institution to directly engage with crucial human health actors – researchers, practitioners, policymakers, patients, and the public – to exploit on-going research and explore this challenge.
If you would like to be a part of our series, please contact: mason.institute@ed.ac.uk